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5 Comments

  1. Devanshi Amin
    30/09/2021

    In depth yet easy to get explanations

  2. Anthony Zirilli
    30/09/2021

    Wonderful overview and references, thank you Karalyn

  3. Joanne McMahon
    01/10/2021

    Has anyone seen alcohol wipes used for nausea as per GRACE teams?
    See https://vitualis.com/?p=3039 and https://ep.bmj.com/content/105/3/190.abstract

    • Karalyn Huxhagen
      04/10/2021

      hi Joanne-I had not seen this but it is interesting. The article I wrote for AJP is part of a very large body of work I did as a teaching tool for a hospital to try and put the pathways of prescribing in perspective. I note the alcohol wipes study was for post operative nausea and vomiting (PONV). the work for PONV involves the chemoreceptor trigger zone (CTZ) and is one of the areas of research for Cannabanoids. if the alcohol is able to trick the CTZ pathway than that is an interesting tool to consider. There is work in the area of migraine with products such as Clary Sage and Lavender as an inhaled agent. we live in interesting times of research especially going back to explore the use of herbs/products from other cultures to determine how first nation peoples from all continents healed their people.

  4. James Lawson
    05/10/2021

    Great article Karalyn!
    Pharmacists should particularly note the advice to take a thorough history when handling a direct request for supply of the Schedule 3 antiemetics metoclopramide or prochlorperazine. These medicines are approved under the Poisons Standard only for treatment of nausea due to migraine, and supply of these medicines for any other indication should occur as a Schedule 4 Prescription Only Medicine.

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