Research Roundup


Debbie Rigby takes a look around at recent research news

Deprescribing conversations: a closer look at prescriber–patient communication

Exploration of initiation, style and content of patient and healthcare provider communication around deprescribing reveals variation in conversations varied between PPI and benzodiazepine users. This exploratory study provides insight into how educational interventions may change patient and healthcare provider deprescribing conversations. The researchers suggest that healthcare providers will need to tailor deprescribing conversations accordingly.

Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety, first published October 20, 2018.

 

Moral dilemmas reflect professional core values of pharmacists in community pharmacy

Professional core values were identified in moral dilemma narratives of pharmacists in community pharmacy and customised for their practice. Core values included being reliable within the pharmacist‐patient relationship and collaboration with other health professionals, responsibility to society, commitment to the patient’s well‐being and pharmaceutical expertise.

International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, first published 19 October 2018.

 

Evaluation of a prompt card for community pharmacists performing consultations with patients on anticoagulation

The aim of this study is to evaluate in practice a pharmacist’s prompt card developed to support effective patient consultation, with an emphasis on anticoagulated patients. Three key questions were developed to lead the pharmacist to understand the patient’s knowledge, motivation and concerns.

Pharmacy Practice 2018;16(3):1244.

 

Real-world effectiveness evaluation of budesonide/formoterol Spiromax

Among UK patients with asthma and COPD, real-world use of BF Spiromax was non-inferior to BF Turbuhaler in terms of disease control. Among patients with asthma, switching to BF Spiromax was associated with reduced exacerbations, reduced SABA use and improved treatment stability versus continuing on BF Turbuhaler.

BMJ Open 2018;8:e022051.

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