Lifting the veil


PSA National President Dr Shane Jackson, Australian Digital Health Agency CEO Tim Kelsey, and Chair of the MHR Project Working Group Chris Campbell at the guidelines launch in Canberra.
PSA National President Dr Shane Jackson, Australian Digital Health Agency CEO Tim Kelsey, and Chair of the MHR Project Working Group Chris Campbell at the guidelines launch in Canberra.

New My Health Record guidelines have been launched to help pharmacists understand and navigate the digital system

The PSA has launched new guidelines to support pharmacists in using the My Health Record system.

My Health Record is currently at a crucial stage of rolling out across pharmacies, and will be providing all Australians with a record by the end of the year unless they opt out.

The system enables health practitioners to access important health information including reports, scans, treatments, medicines, medical conditions and allergies.

New guidelines released by the PSA cover the various nuts and bolts of the My Health Record system, allowing pharmacists to gain a better grasp on the policy and procedures surrounding its use.

The guidelines also explore matters of privacy, consent, security, access, quality assurance, and patient support.

PSA National President Dr Shane Jackson, who is Chair of the My Health Record Project Advisory Group, says having access to information will allow pharmacists to deliver more effective and efficient care.

“Pharmacists have a professional responsibility to review their practice and where necessary, build on their digital health competency, to integrate use of the My Health Record system into patient care,” says Dr Jackson.

“PSA is delighted to offer these professional guidelines for pharmacy practice as well as implementation tools for digital health.”

Queensland pharmacist and Chair of the Project Working Group, Chris Campbell, says the ease of access to information by using My Health Record will make a big difference for pharmacists when providing care.

“The My Health Record integration helps to make key clinical decisions possible at the point of professional interaction such as dispensing and medication review,” says Mr Campbell.

“Until now, pharmacists have been dispensing, counselling, providing advice, and conducting medication reconciliation partially blindfolded.

“My Health Record helps to lift the veil and our contributions will further cement pharmacists as an integral member of the primary health care team.”

See the guidelines here. Funding for the work was provided by the Australian Digital Health Agency.

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