Naturopathy: ‘If it wasn’t so serious it would be funny.’


spoonful of vitamins

Taree pharmacist and Friends of Science in Medicine member Ian Carr is stepping up a campaign against naturopathy in pharmacy, the Daily Telegraph reports.

Reporter Jane Hansen spoke to Carr, who has written in the past for the AJP criticising homoeopathy, as well as Blackmores’ Lesley Braun and the Pharmacy Guild’s Greg Turnbull, after Blackmores advertised last week for naturopaths to work in Sydney pharmacies as part of an “in-store health and wellbeing team”.

Carr told Hansen that he plans to campaign against the placement of naturopaths in pharmacies because “its message is contrary to the dispensing side”.

“I think there’s a real undercurrent, a lot of consumers out there who want to be dealt with in an honest and science-based manner,” Carr told the AJP today.

“But the general population’s level of scientific literacy is not high, and that’s where part of the problem comes in. A lot of people wouldn’t know the difference between an anecdote and a clinical trial.”

He says Friends of Science in Medicine has been working to discourage the promotion of certain complementary and alternative therapies in pharmacy for some time, particularly homeopathy.

“We put a letter to the Australian Pharmacy Leaders’ Forum about that, and got knocked back, but they eventually took the issue of homeopathy to their meeting and put out a letter confirming that they don’t support homeopathy in pharmacy. That was after the NHMRC put out their absolutely unequivocal statement, too,” says Carr.

“So we’re sort of chipping away and getting there.”

Carr told the AJP that he does not understand why pharmacies can employ naturopaths and refer their patients to them without close supervision, and still receive QCPP accreditation.

“You’ve got the dispensary up one end and people getting their important prescription medicines… but I honestly cannot imagine, if you then forward them to the naturopath to talk about complementary medicines, what they’re going to be told.

“Are they going to have their eyes read with iridology, or have their blood scanned and be told there’s all sorts of things wriggling around in there? If it wasn’t so serious it would be funny.

“There’s a huge market at the moment for this acid/alkali diet. This is where they assess your current health and tell you you’ve got to start eating more acidic or alkaline foods.

“Anybody with a background in science will tell you there’s a thing called homoestasis where if you eat acidic food your body will balance it out.

“I don’t understand why a chain would be ticked off for quality assurance when what to me would be a basic element of the code of ethics is not being adhered to.”

Carr says that he suspects that naturopathy is coming to the fore as pharmacies strive to improve the performance of their front of shop sections, as dispensary profits decline thanks to price disclosure.

“So there will be ongoing campaigns by myself and other friends of science in medicine members, because I’m personally feeling that we are degrading our own profession at a time when we’ve never been better educated as far as pharmacists are concerned,” says Carr.

“If I was a pharmacist who employed a naturopath, I would be ensuring, quality-control-wise, that the advice they were giving was put in writing, and I would be looking over their shoulder for everything that they were recommending, if they were using my premises in order to further their practice.”

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51 Comments

  1. Joseph Conway
    09/05/2016

    Maybe the Federal Government

  2. Ron Batagol
    10/05/2016

    I couldn’t agree more! At a time when PSA and others are starting to see “light at the end of the tunnel” in working towards having pharmacists working collaboratively in clinics, in a remunerated advisory role with doctors, it smacks of lemming-like madness for pharmacies to think of setting a naturopathic focus in-house. It may take some time, but, just as pharmacists have been practising, in a clinical advisory capacity in many hospitals over several years, a role that enhances the input of community pharmacists in the variety of primary care and educative activities, appropriately remunerated is the only way to go. It’s already happening overseas, especially in the U.K. Pandering to naturopathic and similar vogues can only detract from the image of the pharmacist as scientifically- trained and respected health professionals.

    • Albervin
      10/05/2016

      I suggest these people read “Cure” by Dr. Jo Marchant. How can a pharmacist dispense some medicines which are marginally more effective than a placebo and then denigrate another form of therapy? The sad truth is that we might consider ourselves people of science but in many ways we, and to a degree GPs, are narrow minded and biased. I saw the effects of placebos over 40 years ago and they were very positive. Mr Carr may even learn something amazing if he reads the book: there are some things that cannot be explained by science.

      • Kellie
        10/05/2016

        The ignorance of this article astounds me. Does this author have any personal tertiary education?
        Apparently not, as the points that are argumented against health care practitioners in this document are neither factual or referenced.
        I myself hold a BHSc and work part time in a pharmacy as an advisory Naturopath and part time in my own clinic.
        The amount of consumers we assist weekly is staggering, and our client base is only getting stronger as local community is beginning to understand the benefit they are receiving with regards to optimizing their own health through the integrated professional knowledge and services of both medical (pharmacists) and health (naturopaths).
        We also offer detailed and accurate interaction advice on prescriptions and supplements, and go one step further to look after and care for our clients.
        I would suggest to this author before making a fool of themselves with unwarranted claims and remarks, that the facts need to be just that, factual, before putting pen to paper again.

        • Kellie
          10/05/2016

          I also suggest to Mr Carr, if he stocks any health supplements or herbal remedies in his own pharmacy that he reconsider his inventory decisions, unless he has professionally educated staff who can efficiently screen and advise his valued customers on the benefits and adverse effects of these medicines.
          Unless, of course, he just wants both pieces of the pie, being prescriptions and health supplements, for his own greed…

          • Ian Carr
            10/05/2016

            Kellie, my pharmacy stocks zero dodgy products like ear candles, homeopathy, fat burning pills and (so called) detox agents. I do stock a small range of common supplements, some of which have some level of evidence. My pharmacists and I are quite happy to field questions about whether a supplement might be useful. Upon investigation, the answer is usually “no” or “not much”. I use Cochrane and the Natural Medicines Database often. Furthermore, I have devised a sticker for supplements which warns consumers that claims made are NOT verified by authorities, such as the TGA.
            My question to you is: as a Naturopath, do you use Iridology, Hemaview, acupuncture, homeopathy or any other pseudoscientific “modailities” ? If so, my point is proven.

          • Romi
            12/05/2016

            Dear Ian, my understanding is that the TGA does scrutinise claims made on products and in fact, claims are not allowed to be made unless the level of evidence is accepted by the TGA.

          • Ian Carr
            13/05/2016

            For listed products, (most CAMs) there is no process of evaluating claims. Marketers are supposed to hold certain documents of evidence, but are rarely checked. the only guard against health fraud we have are the rules about what may be claimed, which is why labels invariably say “may help” or “support”. Should a claim turn out to be incorrect or illegal, the glacially slow complaints process takes months and months. All good news for scammers everywhere — like Peter Foster and his SensaSlim.

          • Kay Ritson
            17/05/2016

            You really need to read more. there is a huge body of scientific evidence in support of the efficacy of Acupuncture. It may also have escaped your notice that Acupuncturists and Chinese herbalists are registered under AHPRA.

          • Ian Carr
            18/05/2016

            I think you will find that with the development of better placebo acupuncture tools, that the evidence for acupuncture is looking less sturdy. The main red flag for critical thinkers is that acupuncture theory is based on the undemonstrable agent “chi”. (“The invisible and the non-existent look very much alike.” Delos McKown)

      • Ian Carr
        10/05/2016

        I had a quick peek at your book “Cure”. If it’s looking at such phenomena as placebo, nocebo etc., there is no doubt the human mind is remarkable and has a great effect on our physical state. HOWEVER that is not the same as diagnosing from people’s iris colours, nor validating theories about invisible phenomena like “chi”.
        The question then becomes: can I ethically treat with placebos? I feel the answer here is rarely “yes”.

    • Kay Ritson
      10/05/2016

      So why are so many Pharmacies selling unproven weight loss programs and dangerous ‘weight loss’ supplements such as Garcinia cambogia? What are your qualifications in Nutrition? I am a Naturopath but I also have a Masters in Human Nutrition. What are the qualifications of the person who runs your weight loss section in your pharmacy? What do you know about the interactions between herbal medicine and pharmaceutical drugs? What do you know about te contraindications of nutritional supplements and herbal medicines with each other and with pharmaceutical drugs? I studied these and more in my Naturopathic course.

      • Ian Carr
        10/05/2016

        If you didn’t take supplements or herbs, they would not interact with the drugs.

        • Romi
          14/05/2016

          You are beating up an innocent grandmother who is making a meal for the sick neighbour. Looking up drug and herb interactions on Mims means you enter all the drugs and the herbs and you will see so often, that the three or more drugs the patient is on interact with each other. Is anyone jumping up and down about that? Some of these drug/drug interactions raise a red flag but it isn’t discussed openly. Many times, I have typed in to the computer the list of drugs the patient is on and several intereact, sometimes in a very dangerous way. Mostly, the herbs do not interact and the ones that do are well published. Having a look at the statistics of all the deaths and disability caused by pharmaceutical medicine and then the miniscule negative impact that natural medicines have had, one wonders why the beat up? Unbiased academics are the people we want to listen to and learn from. Then we can try the evidence and science-based natural medicine and see if it works for us. We can seek the advice of a Naturopath in the first place to get a better idea of what might work in our case. If that goes well, we might not need the side effect laden pharmaceutical medicine at that time.

          I emphasise – Naturopaths will be assisting pharmacy customers with science and evidence-based natural products as
          required and how to navigate the sea of colours and shapes on the
          vitamin wall. Without your Naturopath, the pharmacy vitamin section
          would be no better than a supermarket.

  3. Danielle Southon
    10/05/2016

    Naturopaths are also trained professionals. The current state of health is a clear indication that medicines alone are NOT the only answer for managing disease and certainly not for PREVENTING it. I welcome both sides working together here. Food is our first medicine – pharmacists get little to no training in nutrition and nor do our doctors! There are many chronic diseases that can be reversed by changing diets alone. People have the right to have access to that information and to become empowered to be active participants in their own health. It’s time the model changed. Pharmacists in Europe have embraced this model for decades.

    • Frank van der Kooy
      11/05/2016

      Naturopaths might be trained in something but I would not go as far as calling them ‘medical’ professionals. I do agree that a balanced diet, but also physical exercise, is critical for general health and indeed might reverse a chronic condition. Having worked in Europe for many years I cannot support the claim that pharmacists in Europe has embraced the integration of CM with conventional medicine. For example in the Netherlands there is not even a single department at any University that support or perform research on CM, not even the “phytochemistry” of herbs. That some pharmacies have fallen for the “all natural, all holistic” propaganda has indeed happened, but the scientific community over there is frowning upon this and is actively trying to reverse this dangerous trend.

  4. David Newby
    10/05/2016

    Absolutely agree – it frustrates me no end as an academic that teaches a course in interpreting evidence, and who writes an evidence-based textbook, to see all this teaching ignored once out in profession for the sake of profit. I would be a happy pharmacist if I never see another basket of ear candles sitting on the front bench of a pharmacy again!

    • Kay Ritson
      10/05/2016

      but you are quite happy to have pharmacists, with zero nutrition training selling dodgy weight loss programs, vitamins and other supplements in their pharmacies and with know knowledge of beauty therapy selling cosmetics, perfumes, gifts etc?

      • Aequitarum Custos
        11/05/2016

        Pharmacists don’t sell those. The store the pharmacy is in sells those, and just puts them next to the pharmacy…

        • Kay Ritson
          17/05/2016

          But the profits go to the pharmacy owner. Maybe some of the naysayers need to go and find out about modern Naturopath training before commenting. I studied Clinical Medicine, Anatomy and physiology, the contraindications of herbal and nutritional supplements, possible interactions between medicines and herbs and supplements. I learned to take a comprehensive history from clients that includes medical history, drugs and supplements being used and a lot more about safety, ethics and TGA regulations. In addition I hold a Masters degree in human Nutrition from Deakin University. to practice, I am required to be a member of a professional association, hold a current first aid certificate and be insured for professional indemnity and public liability. I can’t afford to give unsafe advice. I am also bound by the COAG National Code of conduct for unregistered health workers.

      • David Newby
        11/05/2016

        I don’t think I said I was happy with pharmacists selling ‘dodgy weight loss programs’. I am not happy with pharmacists being associated with, and therefore giving legitimacy to, any ‘dodgy’ products/services/programs.

        • UnderappreciatedPharmacist
          12/05/2016

          Thank you David. Always nice to see another pharmacist who disagrees with that.

          Do you own or just work like me?

          • David Newby
            24/05/2016

            I work, I don’t own

      • UnderappreciatedPharmacist
        12/05/2016

        Hi Kay,

        Of course we are not happy about it. There are still those among us that actively steer our patients away from dodgy things. Just make sure the Big Box Pharmacy manager doesn’t overhear you discourage a customer from buying something! Heaven forbid you act ethically or in the best interest of anything but the bottom line!

        I have no real problem with seeing perfumes in pharmacy, not sure where your argument is there, but I do think that there are better things to stock in your pharmacy. Unfortunately as long as Big Box stocks things, so will the smaller guys.

  5. Katherine Maslen
    10/05/2016

    Anyone that says that naturopathy is not evidence based is either ignorant or has not taken the time to read any research. These days, naturopaths are Bachelor qualified (4 years full time study) and all of their assessment is evidence based. Sure, they use empirical knowledge as well, but this is combined with a strong evidence base and every day there are dozens of studies being published on herbal medicines and nutrition. Take for example the double blind placebo controlled study that found that St John’s Wort was as effective as SSRI’s in treating depression without side effects, plus many others (here’s a Cochrane review http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD000448.pub3/abstract ). Naturopathy has a strong emphasis on nutrition and EVERYTHING we know about nutrients comes from research. So when a naturopath prescribes you CoQ10 when you’re taking a statin – they know the biochemical pathways that are implicated and how that exact nutrient plays a role in replenishing the C0Q10 that is being prevented be the stain from being produced.

    A naturopath is a pharmacy is ideal – we complement each other perfectly. Herbal medicines and nutritional supplements can help to allay side effects of medications and make patients more compliant. They can help to improve medication efficacy which means that a patient may not need the medication for as long. They also provide an important alternative to patients who are out of options because their medications are not working or they have a contraindication to taking a medicine – for example those that cannot take HRT for risk of clotting, or those that have allergies to medicines and cannot be treated conventionally.

    If someone comes in with chronic immune issues that has had multiple rounds of antibiotics then some Andrographis or Echinacea root are a great option and yes there is solid research on both of these herbs too.

    In 10-20 years time we’ll look back on the madness that is Friends of Science in Medicine and the way that conventional medicine has disregarded traditional methods of healing and be embrasured by it. Traditional medicine needs to merge with conventional medicine – it’s not one against the other – they actually compliment each other extremely well.

    P.S Yes I’m a properly trained and evidence based clinical practitioner.

    • Dennis Bowden
      10/05/2016

      What do you call alternative medicine that works?

      Medicine.

    • kaitch
      10/05/2016

      I guess you’d know that evidence does not support the use of CoQ10 supplements with statins, too..

      • Jenny Graves
        10/05/2016

        I’m afraid you’re wrong there! http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17493470 And yes, I’m a naturopathy student! We do have to back up our claims with scientific research, contrary to what many people believe.

        • Shane Norman
          10/05/2016

          You realise you have to evaluate ALL the evidence dont you? This is called cherry picking a very unscientific approach. Typical amateur. The evidence for this drug is patchy at best.

          https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/coenzyme-q10-for-heart-failure-the-hype-and-the-science/

          • Kay Ritson
            17/05/2016

            As is the evidence for the use of statins.

          • Shane Norman
            17/05/2016

            Statins have the advantage of being based on real human biology and not some first century vitalistic fallacy. The primary discussion is on the specific sub groups for which the treatment is most effective and its role in reducing mortality in the light of a complex multi factorial condition. And guess what the fact that these discussions and ongoing studies are taking place is more proof that science based approaches work. I have no doubt that the use of statins will change as more studies are done and the optimistic views of some of the manufacturers is modified. These are facts as is the fact that when your magic remedies are properly investigated by real scientists any effect disappears. You exist in the realm of biological noise and once that is controlled for there is nothing real left. And trying to defend weak evidence by pointing to other emerging evidence is not the behaviour of a scientist as you claim but of an amateur.

  6. Frank van der Kooy
    10/05/2016

    As with many other things in life it is all about money and it has very little to do with improving healthcare and it has got absolutely nothing to do with a scientific evidence base. The pharmacy makes a bit of extra money, the naturopath makes a lot of money because they now suddenly have a huge market. Being allowed in a pharmacy gives them legitimacy and to some degree credibility – after all the public thinks that everything in a pharmacy is evidence based (and that the pharmacist really cares about your health) and thus naturopathy suddenly becomes “evidence based”. It is a sad state of affairs when the pharmacy industry openly support naturopathy and the like. They are however not alone in this – unfortunately there are some universities, such as Western Sydney University, who are leading the way. And again it is in effect all about money.
    https://frankvanderkooy.wordpress.com/2016/05/06/how-did-western-sydney-university-wsu-react-to-my-serious-warnings-regarding-the-operational-matters-at-the-nicm

    • Steven Miller
      10/05/2016

      don’t know many wealthy naturopaths. I know a lot too.

    • Kay Ritson
      17/05/2016

      How does a Naturopath employed in a pharmacy on the retail wage award become wealthy? They are paid a wage just like the pharmacy assistants and do not get commission on the products they sell in the pharmacy.

      • Frank van der Kooy
        17/05/2016

        Not necessarily wealthy but they do make a living from selling mostly unproven and sometimes dangerous products. I fully agree that a balanced diet and exercise is the way to go but I do think that many naturopaths (who are also people and thus also gullible) are used as pawns for directors of companies such as Blackmores – currently a billionaire, or close to being one. Looking at the increase in Blackmores (and similar companies) share price there are lots of people who do indeed get quite wealthy on the backs of gullible consumers. (in my previous comment I meant to say “write a book” and not “right a book” – it was early morning LOL).

  7. Steven Miller
    10/05/2016

    there is plenty of evidence based information on a lot of herbal/complimentary medicines. For sure there are many dubious products on the market then again some of the studies and claims by pharmaceutical companies on their products can be picked apart as well. This does not have to be an either/or proposition – pharmacists just have to educate themselves. Look at Germany as an example- they are way ahead of us on this one.

  8. Frank van der Kooy
    10/05/2016

    For me it is an either/or proposition. As soon as anyone points to the lack of evidence for eg homeopathy then immediately you will hear the counter argument that many, if not all, pharmaceutical drugs does not have any evidence and of course that they cause severe side effects. This is also the naturopaths main selling point. What they always fail to add is that they actually mean that the exact mechanism of action for a pharmaceutical drug is not always known. This is indeed true. What they fail to add is that the efficacy and the risk is well known – you have to provide this evidence before registration. For example you do not need to know how it works but you need to know that it works and that it is safe to use. The naturopath thus misleads the public by comparing the unknown mechanism of action (the how it works) of pharmaceutical drugs with the complete lack of evidence of efficacy (that it works) of most complementary medicine. The only way to sell their many dubious products and services is thus to destroy conventional medicine, or to make it suspect, and this makes it an either/or proposition – with the blessing of universities such as Western Sydney University.
    https://frankvanderkooy.wordpress.com/2016/02/19/the-national-institute-of-complementary-medicine-australia-what-are-they-up-to/

    • Steven Miller
      10/05/2016

      Firstly, homeopathy is a separate issue. One can have reservations about this completely different idea of medicine and still believe in the efficacy of herbal preparations. One does not have to destroy conventional medicine to recommend complimentary medicine. The two can easily go hand in hand. The evidence is there if you care to have a look. I do question your logic and objectivity. Perhaps you can not wake up someone who is pretending to sleep. As I said before, in Germany most herbal preparations are sold right in the pharmacy and I can assure you the Germans are known for their evidence based science. Have a look at the Natural Medicines Database and you might surprise yourself.

      • Frank van der Kooy
        10/05/2016

        Homeopathy is part of naturopathy. The issues with specifically herbal preparations is so numerous that one can right a book about it. Here is a short excerpt of one of my Blog posts and it is by no means exhaustive

        “The lack of quality control (QC) is a main critique against the use of TCM (specifically Chinese herbal medicine). To address the QC issue the NICM focus on developing analytical methods to quantify preselected compounds. They do this because it constitutes “scientific research”, it creates trust in TCM and it “solves” the QC issue. The NICM is involved with the TGA and was instrumental in establishing a long tradition of use as an indication of safety – which is a somewhat risky thing to assume. Now they are lobbying the regulators that developing methods to quantify “chemical markers” solves the QC issue. The NICM knows that the real problem is that usually the putative active compounds, other compounds that might play a role (positive or negative) and toxic compounds are all unknown. The long term effects, compound–drug interactions, bioavailability, etc. of all of these unknown compounds are also unknown, and the levels of all of these unknown compounds will differ dramatically between batches, suppliers, year of harvest, storage conditions etc. On top of that, adulteration and a decrease in adherence to prescribed medicine is also a big concern”.

        • Steven Miller
          11/05/2016

          Quality control is an issue I agree but there are brands that one can feel confident about recommending. It in and of itself should not be a reason to negate this form of medicine. We do need better standards and once again I mention Germany as something Australia should aspire too as they have strict quality control regulations there. The general population embraces this form of medicine and they do not make a distinction between the two.The promotion of complimentary medicines should go hand in hand with quality control but should not be a reason to throw the baby out with the bath water.

          • Frank van der Kooy
            11/05/2016

            The term quality control of herbs is completely misunderstood. The problem is not the lack of quality control, as the CM industry wants you to believe, but our inability to be in control of the quality. We can measure specific pre-selected compounds (1or 2 compounds out of the thousands of compounds present which is a reductionist approach – a term that naturopaths do not like much because their treatments are holistic) but we cannot predict or control how much of compound X will be in our herbal product. It is what it is and we cannot do anything about it. Granted I do think that there will be some herbs that will show benefit and will have a good risk profile but the QC issues apply to them as well. My main issue however is the modus operandi of naturopaths and the CM industry as a whole.One can write a book about it but I’ve done the next best thing and started a blog where I have written extensively on how they go about doing their business and what the impact of this will be on society. It makes for a good read and any comments will be more than welcome. https://frankvanderkooy.wordpress.com

        • Kay Ritson
          17/05/2016

          Homeopathy is not part of Naturopathy. some Naturopathy courses may include homeopathy as an elective but there are separate qualifications for Homeopaths. I am a Naturopath who also has a masters degree in Human Nutrition. My naturopathy course did not include any homeopathy at all. My practice is primarily based on nutrition and nutritional supplements are only part of the many recommendations I may give to my clients.

  9. Romi
    12/05/2016

    How cool that the advertising on the right hand side of this article are both for complementary medicines based on herbal medicine – Prospan for coughs (and it really works, all you scientists) and Iberogast (featured at last years Gastroenterologist Conference in Brisbane). Naturopaths will be assisting pharmacy customers with these products as required and how to navigate the sea of colours and shapes on the vitamin wall. Without your Naturopath, the pharmacy vitamin section would be no better than a supermarket.

  10. Romi
    13/05/2016

    How cool that the advertising on the right hand side of this
    article are both for complementary medicines based on herbal medicine –
    Prospan for coughs (and it really works, all you scientists) and
    Iberogast (featured at last years Gastroenterologist
    Conference in Brisbane). Naturopaths will be assisting pharmacy
    customers with these products as required and how to navigate the sea of
    colours and shapes on the vitamin wall. Without your Naturopath, the
    pharmacy vitamin section would be no better than a
    supermarket.

    • Ian Carr
      13/05/2016

      The Tim Minchin thing again. It’s real medicine, if they have been able to prove it!

      • Romi
        14/05/2016

        There is plenty of science and proof, including for the two natural medicines advertised next to your article. I don’t know what you mean by Tim Minchen, my absolutely favourite comedian. I know he is super smart but I did not know he was a medical scientist like you?

        • Ian Carr
          18/05/2016

          Google the short video “Storm”. It has been a worldwide sensation. If you already like Tim Minchin, you will LOVE it.

          https://youtu.be/HhGuXCuDb1U

          • Romi
            19/05/2016

            There is no science, no scientist and the animation is not even humorous.

  11. KB
    27/05/2016

    Some vitamins and supplements have a rich research history. Take for example myoqinon, a CoQ10 product that is registered as an adjuvant therapy for HF in Europe by Pharma Nord. It has been in 75 human clinical trials and is sold as a dietary supplement in pharmacies and healthfood stores around the world. However, the pharmacist likely knows very little about coenzyme q10, this product nor about the scientific studies it has been in and the statistical significance the results show. However, a naturopath most likely will know these things and be able to talk to the customer about it, prevention and things in the natural section that can complement traditional therapies. How is that not a plus and who does it ultimately harm? For sure it is not the customer who gets great insight and service.

  12. Guy Callum-Power
    04/08/2016

    Crikey, having read through the comments it seems like we urgently need better regulation (or any kind for that matter!) of naturopaths.

    Some of the rubbish being peddled here is astounding, dangerous, and totally unethical.

    I once had a patient come to my pharmacy looking for hydrochloric acid because his naturopath told him his system was too alkaline. I’m glad he didn’t go to the pool supplies store first. Only one example of the countless near misses I picked up as a result of these kooks.

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