A time of shortages


empty shelves

The TGA has provided updates on new and ongoing medicine shortages relevant to pharmacy

The shortage warnings include:

* There is limited availability of the hyperthyroidism treatment Neo-Mercazole (carbimazole) 5 mg tablets.

The current shortage of the treatment, which is marketed in Australia by Amdipharm Mercury (Australia), is due to a delay in the manufacturing schedule.

The sponsor has advised the TGA it is working closely with manufacturers to expedite delivery of stock.

There are no safety concerns with the existing supplies of this medicine.

An alternative supply has been arranged, with the TGA approval of a section 19A application for the import and supply of a UK product, Carbimazole tablets 5 mg.

If Neo-Mercazole is unavailable, pharmacies can obtain Carbimazole tablets 5 mg (UK) by contacting Amdipharm Mercury (Australia) by phone on 1800 235 305 or email

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* The ongoing shortage of clomifene 50 mg tablets (also known as clomiphene and marketed in Australia as Clomid) has been extended.

The sponsor, Sanofi-Aventis Australia, has advised the TGA that this product is expected to be available again after 30 June 2017.

The TGA has granted a section 19A approval for the import and supply of an alternative French product Clomid (clomifene citrate) 50 mg tablets.

Pharmacies can obtain the alternative French product Clomid (clomifene citrate) 50 mg tablets by ordering the product in the normal manner through the wholesaler, using the same wholesaler codes. For enquiries relating to supply, contact Sanofi Customer Service on 1800 640 791

Related product Serophene has been discontinued and removed from the market as a result of ongoing technical manufacturing and supply issues.

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* The sponsor of Bactroban (mupirocin) 20 mg/g ointment tubes, GlaxoSmithKline Australia, has advised the TGA that this product is now expected to be available again after 31 January.

Previous arrangements for alternative products approved under section 19A of the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 are no longer in place.

Photo by Tom Oates, 2008

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2 Comments

  1. David Haworth
    01/02/2017

    One of the biggest pains at the moment is no Indomethacin in the country.. and summer is a great time for gout!

    • Russell Smith
      06/02/2017

      It’s back – just got Arthrexin on Friday

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