End the exclusion


Group of five people with one crossed out

The PSA has called on the Medicare Benefits Schedule Review Taskforce to include pharmacist services on the MBS

In its submissions to the taskforce reference groups, the PSA focused on the inclusion of pharmacist services on the MBS to ensure pharmacists are no longer excluded from the rest of the allied healthcare workforce in the delivery of consultation based services upon referral from a general practitioner.

The PSA’s recommendations stem from its two recent reports, Medicine Safety: Take Care and Pharmacists in 2023.

Both the reports advocate for the empowerment of pharmacists to do more than the current healthcare system allows, by harnessing their skills and expertise as medicine experts.

PSA says it is the organisation’s firm view that pharmacists must be involved in the care of patients whenever medicines are part of their health management plan, and particularly in the context of chronic disease management.

PSA National President Dr Chris Freeman said although the Allied Health Reference Group recommended this action in February following previous PSA submissions, there is still more work to be done.

These recommendations out for consultation must make their way to the Minister for Health’s office and once and for all cease the exclusion of pharmacist access to the Medicare Benefits Schedule, he said.

“PSA has advocated over many years to develop funding models to reflect pharmacists’ extensive expertise and contribution to Australia’s health,” said Dr Freeman.

“Pharmacists have been calling for access to the MBS to reflect their skills, training and experience for longer than many of us can remember.

“While this recommendation now exists, it is focused on long-term implementation. Given the rate of medicine-related harm being experienced by Australians and the potential for pharmacists to contribute to medicine safety and quality use of medicines, it is critical that the implementation of this recommendation is not delayed,” Dr Freeman said.

The inclusion of pharmacists in allied healthcare teams is particularly important for vulnerable population groups including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, PSA said.

In writing to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Reference Group, PSA noted the current issues relating to medication adherence. Pharmacists can make a significant contribution to support adherence through the provision of medicine information, assessing each person’s needs and tailoring solutions accordingly, it said.

Pharmacists also have a key role to play in mental health care teams. PSA said it supports recommendations from the Mental Health Reference Group to encourage coordinated support for patients with chronic and mental illnesses and access to mental health services in residential aged care.

PSA said it believes that pharmacists should have a role in delivering care as part of a mental health care plan, particularly where medication forms part of the patient’s treatment plan – particularly  relevant for mental health care services in residential aged care.

“We look forward to continuing to work with the groups involved in the MBS Review as they undertake their consultation on these recommendations, and then working with the Minister for Health to make these recommendations a reality,” Dr Freeman said.

Previous Our five biggest risk factors
Next Injecting room moves patients towards treatment

NOTICE: It can sometimes take awhile for comment submissions to go through, please be patient.

6 Comments

  1. Kevin Hayward
    15/06/2019

    Primary care pharmacists have been stifled by the monopoly of service provision of the 6CPA. The profession needs to be able to grow and develop outside of the boundaries of the four walls of the retail pharmacy. Access to MBS item numbers, as is the norm for other allied health professionals, will facilitate professional growth, development and encourage collaborative practice with the rest of the primary care team. As an example, I spent yesterday afternoon in multidisciplinary case conferences with GPs and nurses, I have been doing this for years, and I know that my unique contribution brings a different line of thought into the treatment decision making process. Pharmacists have so many skills to contribute to the team, apart from clinical interventions, I have been involved in audit, prescribing analysis, governance, commissioning and used my formal skills in teaching and management frequently. So as a PM once said “give us a fair shake of the sauce bottle”.

    • Ex-Pharmacist
      15/06/2019

      Exactly Kevin, just like every other private health service provider in Australia.
      But your forgetting about the Guild.

      The Guild opposes any government payments direct to individual pharmacists (i.e. MBS) with the duplicitous power it has over the government of the day.

      A pillar of the Guild mandates all public funding must go to the section 90 pharmacy owner(s).

      The Guild will simply never allow this to happen, ensuring every cent of the overly generous government payments for the myriad of “pharmacy services” (6CPA / 7CPA) goes to its members.

      That is what Guild members pay their membership for.

      • Kevin Hayward
        15/06/2019

        Maybe these should be a “medical services” provided by pharmacists under MBS and not a pharmacy service under 6CPA? In theory it is then nothing to do with the Guild?

        • Ex-Pharmacist
          15/06/2019

          Freeman: “We look forward to continuing to work with the groups involved in the MBS Review as they undertake their consultation on these recommendations, and then working with the Minister for Health to make these recommendations a reality”
          All power to Dr Freeman and the PSA for advocating for this.

          But note who he is advocating to.
          The Minister for Health.
          The Pharmacy Guild of Australia puts enormous resources in its “advocacy” efforts to the Minister for Health, and clearly this PSA initiative is in direct conflict with the Guild.

          Simply, when it comes to PSA vs Guild, it is David vs. Goliath.

          Freeman: “Pharmacists have been calling for access to the MBS to reflect their skills, training and experience for longer than many of us can remember.
          And pharmacists will continue to ask for MBS access, for years & decades to come.

          • Kevin Hayward
            15/06/2019

            Remember .. David won!

          • Andrew
            16/06/2019

            But that was 5000 years ago!

Leave a reply