Rural, Aboriginal scholarship recipients named


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The Pharmacy Guild of Australia has announced the recipients of the Rural Pharmacy Scholarship Scheme 2018

Thirty-seven students from across the country have been awarded the scholarship, the Guild has announced.

The Rural Pharmacy Scholarships provide financial support to students from rural and remote communities to encourage them to undertake undergraduate or graduate studies in pharmacy at university.

Scholarship holders receive $10,000 each year, for up to four years of study, to help cover the costs associated with study away from home.

They also participate in a mentor program aimed at reinforcing the students’ ties to rural and regional Australia.

National President of the Pharmacy Guild of Australia George Tambassis said scholarship holders received financial and mentoring support to ensure they got the most out of their university studies.

“And the fact that they are encouraged to conduct their professional careers in rural Australia is fantastic,” he said.

“The mentoring program helps the students develop a learning plan and also provides support to students outside the university environment. It’s an important support for students who have come from rural and remote areas and are studying away from their family base.”

Scholarship holders are encouraged to pursue a career in pharmacy in a rural or remote area of Australia after graduation. During their studies they also have a role in promoting rural pharmacy as a career choice to secondary school students.

The Rural Pharmacy Scholarship Scheme is an initiative of the Rural Support Programs, established in recognition of the key role pharmacists play in maintaining the health of all Australians, particularly those in rural and remote areas.

This Project is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health as part of the Sixth Community Pharmacy Agreement.

Scholarship Holder

Home Town

State

University

Aiden

McGinniss

Warracknabeal

VIC

Latrobe University

Angus

Koerstz

Dubbo

NSW

University of Canberra

Caleb

Solomano

Maryborough

VIC

Latrobe University

Chloe

Hrkac

Dimbulah

QLD

James Cook University

Claire

Conway

Emerald

QLD

Queensland University of Technology

Clare

Carter

Nyngan

NSW

University of Sydney

Codie

Whitehead

Broken Hill

NSW

Charles Sturt University

Courtney

Brandon

Gunnedah

NSW

University of New England

Emily

Jones

Barham

NSW

Latrobe University

Emily

Leighton

Bowen

QLD

University of New England

Gabrielle

Upton

Charleville

QLD

University of Queensland

Hayley

White

Canowindra

NSW

Charles Sturt University

Jack

Wilkinson

Douglas

QLD

James Cook University

Jay

Hogan

Horsham

VIC

Latrobe University

Jennifer

Stewart

Wallumbilla

QLD

University of Queensland

Jessie

Evans

Moama

NSW

Latrobe University

Karli

Toms

Merimbula

NSW

University of Canberra

Kate

Thomson

Maclean

NSW

Queensland University of Technology

Kirsten

Stockdale

Eldorado

VIC

Monash University

Larissa

Kahl

Loxton

SA

University of South Australia

Laura

Hughes

Durham Ox

VIC

University of New England

Lauren

Irvine

Naracoorte

SA

University of South Australia

Leshai

Welk

Port Lincoln

SA

University of New England

Madison

Crowder

Benalla

VIC

Latrobe University

Matthew

Sainty

Griffith

NSW

Charles Sturt University

Maya

Mitchell

Cohuna

VIC

Monash University

Nedd

Brockmann

Forbes

NSW

University of Canberra

Olivia

Douglas

Moulamein

NSW

Monash University

Olivia

Norley

Broken Hill

NSW

University of Sydney

Philippa

Myers

Woodstock

NSW

Charles Sturt University

Rachael

Kapernick

Glenrock

QLD

University of Queensland

Samantha

Jones

Bairnsdale

VIC

RMIT Melbourne

Sara

McCarthy

Rawsonville

NSW

Charles Sturt University

Shanae

Stanyer

Numurkah

VIC

Monash University

Shaylee

Mills

Quairading

WA

Curtin University

Taylah

Walker

Miles

QLD

University of New England

Tyla

Campbell

Molong

NSW

Charles Sturt University

The Guild also announced the the recipients of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Pharmacy Scholarship Scheme (ATSIPSS).

This year three students have been awarded the prestigious scholarship and will receive funding assistance during their time at university. The Guild congratulated Kirralee Natty (University of New England), Teneal Hutchin (University of Queensland) and Lillian Emery (Queensland University of Technology).

Scholarship holders receive $15,000 each year, for up to four years of study, to help cover the costs associated with study.

Mr Tambassis said scholarship holders received financial and mentoring support to ensure they got the most out of their university studies.

“The mentoring program not only helps the students to develop a learning plan, but it provides support to students outside of the university environment,” he said.

“It’s an important tool for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to undertake studies in pharmacy at university.”

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Pharmacy Scholarship Scheme provides incentives for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to undertake training in pharmacy and is funded under the Sixth Community Pharmacy Agreement. It was established in recognition of the key role pharmacists play in providing improved, culturally appropriate pharmacy services to better meet the needs of their local Indigenous communities and patients, as well as maintaining the health of all Australians.

This project is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health as part of the Sixth Community Pharmacy Agreement.

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